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masonry walls

Masonry walls generally consisting of bricks or blocks laid in courses and interspersed with mortar. Masonry is weak in tension and strong in compression, but as a result of the traditional construction methods there are also areas of weakness within masonry structures. This is because the bricks or blocks are laid in courses and bedded in mortar. The mortar forms joints between the individual clay or concrete units of masonry, both horizontally and vertically, at which there are inherent structural weaknesses. It is at these points where wall panels are most likely to fail as a result of lateral loading.

The disadvantage of the wall panels spanning vertically is that when subjected to lateral loads, wind loads induce tension in the brickwork because of the bending moments induced in the wall subjects the bed joints to tensile forces. Therefore, in order to reinforce the wall panels which otherwise would span vertically, it is necessary to install buttressing “shear” walls. These buttressing supports can be provided by suitably designed masonry returns.

The absence of vertical load on the walls can lead to stability problems. Large openings can cause a future problem.

The analysis of the wall stability may be satisfactory.  However, if the wall is found to be insufficient, it may be necessary to introduce a wind-post or pier to stiffen the wall up. Otherwise we could strengthen the wall by using higher strength materials.

We need the following information to check the lateral stability of a masonry walls:

The position and size of any openings in the wall.

The dimensions of the relevant wall panel (length and height).

The details of any internal walls buttressing the outside wall.

The corner details showing the length of wall at right angles to the wall being considered.

The details of the wall construction (e.g. brick and block cavity wall, solid brickwork wall).

Building location.

 

Masonry piers:

In residential buildings to support the ends of beams, masonry piers are usually needed.  Sometimes when a new opening is shaped in walls, there is little remaining of the original wall and a new pier is required.  Masonry piers have good fire resistance and are very good at supporting heavy loads.

If the length of a wall is less than three times of its thickness, then it is called a pier. The pier is normally built with engineering bricks if the loads are heavy. These are bricks with a high compressive strength.

Masonry piers usually require a new pad foundation if they are at ground floor level.

We need the following information to design masonry piers

Architectural layouts of the building showing the location of the pier.

The loading on the pier.

The height of the pier.

 

Reinforced masonry walls:

Where the ground level is higher on one side retaining walls are put in place as the higher side of the wall imposes lateral forces.

Forces can have an impact on the high side causing it to collapse also surcharge loads can also be contributing factor. Overall all materials involved must be considered to ensure the lateral load is considered to ensure a perfect design.

Retaining walls usually are expensive to construct and therefore they should be designed and constructed properly.

For low walls, a masonry wall usually is the best choice. However, a reinforced masonry walls becomes more economical as the retained height of soil increases. Moreover, a reinforced concrete wall always is suitable option when the retained height reaches around 2.5m.

Please include the following information when submitting your order:

Site investigation report or ground condition.

Purpose of use on the higher side of the retaining wall.

Other buildings/areas/ materials close by to the higher side of the retaining wall.

Wall height required.

 

Brickwork one meter height:

Where the ground level is higher on one side retaining walls are put in place as the higher side of the wall imposes lateral forces.

Forces can have an impact on the high side causing it to collapse also surcharge loads can also be contributing factor. Overall all materials involved must be considered to ensure the lateral load is considered to ensure a perfect design.

Retaining walls usually are expensive to construct and therefore they should be designed and constructed properly.

For low walls, a masonry wall usually is the best choice. However, a reinforced masonry wall becomes more economical as the retained height of soil increases. Moreover, a reinforced concrete wall always is suitable option when the retained height reaches around 2.5m.

Please include the following information when submitting your order:

Site investigation report or ground condition.

Purpose of use on the higher side of the retaining wall.

Other buildings/areas/ materials close by to the higher side of the retaining wall.

Wall height required.

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